Undergraduate Program

Degree Curriculum & Requirements

Whether you are interested in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, or plants, ecology, and environment and pollution control, you have an excellent starting point for studying soil science. Best of all, you can finish your soil science degree in just four years. Follow the current curriculum below which outlines the coursework.

Available degree: Bachelor of Science. View/print the current Soil Science B.S. Curriculum Sheet (follow link and scroll down for Soil Science).

The B.S. offers several specialization fields including: Environmental Systems, Turf and Grounds, Soil Informatics, Field Crops, and Science sub-specialization categories.


Information

A degree in Soil Science can open doors that lead to interesting and productive careers. Here you will find some important information about majoring in Soil Science at UW-Madison to help you decide if it’s the right fit for you.

What is Soil Science?

Soil science is the study of the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils. Soil Science allows us to optimize use and preservation of land for agriculture, forestry, recreation, transportation systems, urban development and many other endeavors.

Why study Soil Science?

The food that nourishes us, the water that we drink and the air that we breathe all depend on soils and their life-sustaining properties. Soil Science at the UW-Madison provides an understanding of the practical application of biology, chemistry, physics and earth science principles to integrated land use and environmental protection. Soil Science graduates enjoy a wide array of science, technology and business opportunities in economic and environmentally sound management of natural, agricultural and urban ecosystems.

What do Soil Scientists do?

A career in Soil Science can take you in many directions. If you love to be outdoors, there are opportunities to map and classify soils, or work as a field consultant for farmers or companies and organizations that sell them services and supplies. You could manage turf on golf courses, athletic fields and lawns. Or, if you are interested in protecting and restoring the environment, there are a variety of careers that deal with soil and environmental pollution. These include many jobs that will let you explore biological or chemical solutions to challenging environmental problems and issues. Finally, whatever your interests, becoming a licensed professional soil scientist enhances your credibility and increases your career opportunities.

What classes will I take?

Whether you are interested in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, or plants, ecology, and environment and pollution control, you have an excellent starting point for studying soil science. Best of all, you can finish your soil science degree in just four years. Follow the current four-year plan which outlines your curriculum.

What will my learning environment look like?

The faculty are among the best in the world. The department has modern laboratories and teaching facilities in three adjacent buildings at UW-Madison. There are land and facilities for field studies near Madison , and an array of international contacts and collaborators for work around the world.

Individual advisors are available for each student to help tailor a program that works for you. There are also several established student organizations, such as the Badger Turf and Grounds Club, the Soils Club and the F.H. King Students of Sustainable Agriculture to bring together students with similar interests.

How do I get started?

If you’re interested in becoming a Soil Science major, contact Julie Garvin, jgarvin2@wisc.edu. She can help you schedule an appointment with one of our faculty advisors or provide you with further information about the department. Go to UW Admissions

Student Groups

Badger Turf & Grounds Club
UW Soils Club
F.H. King: Students of Sustainable Agriculture
Student Organization Office

Forms

Soil Sci 299
Soil Sci 399
Soil Sci 699